The Benefits of Starting Small

The problem with most small business owners and entrepreneurs is that they have a million great ideas. Well, that’s not really the problem; the problem is that they can’t decide where to focus their attention because they’re excited about the opportunities that each idea presents.

The same is true with their Web sites. All too often entrepreneurs want to put everything, every great idea, up on their Web site, and give each one space on their home page. They want a discussion board, a blog, a store, a chat room, a directory of professionals in their business, resources, links, an archive for their newsletters, audio and video, the list goes on and on….

What invariably happens is that the site takes twice times as long to build, three times what they budgeted, and when it launches nothing much happens. There are so many choices visitors don’t know what to do–what’s expected of them–and they leave.

Plus, because there are a million things to keep up with on the site, nothing ever gets done. The entrepreneur feels overwhelmed and everything suffers.

Think of it like your garden. You can easily create a cozy space in your yard with a couple of chairs or a bench, surrounded by fragrant flowers and plants that bloom all season long, providing you a perfect place to curl up with a good book. (Or open your laptop and respond to emails if you remembered to wire your garden for wi-fi.)

However, if you try and start a garden that spans your entire property you’ll spend all that first season running from plant to plant, flower to flower, never relaxing, never having time to experiment with new flowers, to find out what works and what doesn’t, to enjoy the benefits of your hard labor.

If you are one of those people with a million good ideas and the need to put them all on your Web site…stop. Take a breath. Choose the one, two or three best, lowest-hanging fruits and start with those for phase I. When you get those working smoothly expand into phase II with some of the other projects you’ve been wanting to try.

Rich Brooks
Watching My Garden Grow

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150 Responses to “The Benefits of Starting Small”

  1. Yecy Delgado

    WOOOOOW I somehow feel like this is my interview. Thank you so much for making me stop. And not only that, I have spent so much time mantaining my site, (wich is still not working), that I have no time to actually sell anything.

  2. Yecy Delgado

    WOOOOOW I somehow feel like this is my interview. Thank you so much for making me stop. And not only that, I have spent so much time mantaining my site, (wich is still not working), that I have no time to actually sell anything.

  3. Scott

    phew…Rich you're a mind reader. Definitely words of wisdom. I'm gonna stop killing myself. This is challenging me to get something small launched in a couple weeks, then "add to the garden" as time, energy and resources allow.

    I do have one question though, it seems that in the work you do, there are typically two domain names e.g. flyte.biz and flyteblog.com.

    Is there a good reason to separate one's website and blog?

  4. Scott

    phew…Rich you're a mind reader. Definitely words of wisdom. I'm gonna stop killing myself. This is challenging me to get something small launched in a couple weeks, then "add to the garden" as time, energy and resources allow.

    I do have one question though, it seems that in the work you do, there are typically two domain names e.g. flyte.biz and flyteblog.com.

    Is there a good reason to separate one's website and blog?

  5. Rich Brooks

    Scott,

    The reason I did it was two-fold:

    1) For a client's job I needed to familiarize myself w/TypePad, which is a hosted blogging platfrom. In other words, I couldn't host it on my own server and w/my own domain.

    2) I feel that a link from a separate domain (flyteblog.com) to my Web site has more weight than a link from w/in the same domain. I don't have proof of this, it's just my assumption.

    That being said, there are benefits to both combining a Web site/blog and separating them.

    Do what feels best and makes the most sense to you.

  6. Rich Brooks

    Scott,

    The reason I did it was two-fold:

    1) For a client's job I needed to familiarize myself w/TypePad, which is a hosted blogging platfrom. In other words, I couldn't host it on my own server and w/my own domain.

    2) I feel that a link from a separate domain (flyteblog.com) to my Web site has more weight than a link from w/in the same domain. I don't have proof of this, it's just my assumption.

    That being said, there are benefits to both combining a Web site/blog and separating them.

    Do what feels best and makes the most sense to you.