Understanding the Social Media Landscape

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The Notes:

My first session of BlogWorld was Chris Heuer and Marshall Kirkpatrick presenting "Understanding the Social Media Landscape."

Social media Web sites are places where people, businesses and organizations can connect with each other. Chris described some of the tenets of social media:

  • not limited by space or the physical world (people can connect from all over the world and unlimited photos, videos and other files can be uploaded)
  • produced with inexpensive technologies
  • widely distributed for almost no cost through RSS
  • typically Web based.

The question was raised whether corporations can be authentic. Chris feels that they’re a legal construct–a figment–and it’s people who are or aren’t authentic. I’m not sure I agree; a corporation can embody a mission or vision that people can rally around. Can’t a mission or vision be authentic? Maybe it’s just semantics.

Chris also laid out the "Four C’s of Social Media":

  • Context
  • Contact
  • Communications
  • Collaboration

A popular phrase I’m seeing throw around lately is "the social
graph." It’s defined–at least in this seminar–as an invisible layer
of connection with others. Social media Web sites like Facebook and MySpace expose these connections, sites like Plaxo helps organize and manage them.

The importance of social media is that it’s helping tear down walls and make connections.

What are the advantages and opportunities?

  • Social media is evergreen, persistent
  • More opportunities to be found
  • It puts a human face on your business
  • Builds trust with the marketplace
  • You can co-create with your customers

What’s interesting and compelling about social media is that it’s being co-created with all of us.

Marshall Kirkpatrick took the podium at this point and talked about
how lots of people–probably many who were at the show–had blogged
their way into their current jobs. He viewed it as a live, public job
interview where you’re continually proving yourself. He sees social
media as a way of getting around the gate keepers, such as editors and
journalists.

At this point I raised my hand and asked how companies could get
started with social media, or even determine if they want to. Marshall
responded that companies should start with RSS feeds, del.icio.us
feeds, etc. RSS is the center of the universe of social media. That
will give them a feel for the social media landscape.

Blogs are another great way for companies to jump in, but aren’t right for all companies. He suggested:

  • Look
  • Listen
  • Join
  • Start.

He also suggested that the best way to get attention in this realm
is to give it away. This seemed to be a theme of the week, which has
been a constant in human relations.

He also posited–I love that word–that the more tags you use on
content, the more available it is to other people. Multi-language tags
could be next, jumping the language barrier and taking your message
even further.

He’s a big proponent of OpenID, a username/password tool that is
becoming more popular on the Web. In fact, I noticed he’s written a post on OpenID recently.

The Takeaway

This session was a good jumping off point
to learn about the underlying ideas of social media, although it didn’t
specifically talk about too many of the sites, except in passing. With
hundreds of social media sites and growing, I guess that was to be
understood.

Small businesses and entrepreneurs who haven’t jumped in to this
next phase of the Web can’t afford to wait much longer. If you haven’t,
you should start subscribing to RSS feeds sooner rather than later. I
plan on writing a post about getting started on this shortly, although
there’s plenty of resources out there if you Google them.

Once you’ve mastered RSS feeds and perhaps started your own blog,
it’s time to investigate LinkedIn, Facebook and other social media
sites, perhaps setting up your own profile pages in these
mini-universes.

Des Walsh had shared earlier
shared with me a function of LinkedIn that I hadn’t realized, that fit
right in with a lot of the content at this session. There’s an Answer
section at LinkedIn where any LinkedIn member can pose a question or
post an answer to someone else. This is a great way of connecting with
others in and out of your network and establish your expertise.

Rich Brooks
Co-Creating with You

  • http://www.titlesuccess.com Shane Kane – TitleSuccess.com

    Social media allows anyone who has a belief in what they do to easily share their passion with others. Isn't that essentially what web 2.0 is all about? It's about finding new and creative ways to exchange ideas without the limitations of traditional media outlets.

  • http://www.titlesuccess.com Shane Kane – TitleSuccess.com

    Social media allows anyone who has a belief in what they do to easily share their passion with others. Isn't that essentially what web 2.0 is all about? It's about finding new and creative ways to exchange ideas without the limitations of traditional media outlets.

  • http://www.britopian.com Michael Brito

    Hey, great article. I also attended the conference. I was a little dissapointed in the organization of the sessions. Several speakers didn't show up; and some of the sessions were off topic.

    I did meet some great people though.

    Michael

  • http://www.britopian.com Michael Brito

    Hey, great article. I also attended the conference. I was a little dissapointed in the organization of the sessions. Several speakers didn't show up; and some of the sessions were off topic.

    I did meet some great people though.

    Michael

  • http://www.BestManagementArticles.com Ismael Tabije

    The article says, "RSS is the center of the universe in social media". I wish I could agree but I haven't found the evidence of it being so.

    My niche article directory in business management, http://www.BestManagementArticles.com has been submitted to almost all the RSS directories online. The problem: my site traffic after my submission to RSS directories is not much different from my traffic before the submission.

    So from my view point there is no evidence at all that there is a mass of people using or reading RSS feeds.

    Or am I missing something here?

  • http://www.BestManagementArticles.com Ismael Tabije

    The article says, "RSS is the center of the universe in social media". I wish I could agree but I haven't found the evidence of it being so.

    My niche article directory in business management, http://www.BestManagementArticles.com has been submitted to almost all the RSS directories online. The problem: my site traffic after my submission to RSS directories is not much different from my traffic before the submission.

    So from my view point there is no evidence at all that there is a mass of people using or reading RSS feeds.

    Or am I missing something here?

  • http://www.flyteblog.com Rich Brooks

    Ismael,

    I think there's a big difference between saying "rss is the center of the universe in social media" and you not getting more traffic because you've submitted your site to RSS directories.

    Are your articles unique, or were they purchased through an article distribution service? Maybe you're not providing enough quality content to attract visitors from these sites?

    Also, I'm not sure I see a social media aspect to your site. It appears to be a site with a lot of business-oriented articles on it, chock full of Google Ads. Is there a place for me to create a profile and share w/my friends? Am I missing something?

  • http://www.flyteblog.com Rich Brooks

    Ismael,

    I think there's a big difference between saying "rss is the center of the universe in social media" and you not getting more traffic because you've submitted your site to RSS directories.

    Are your articles unique, or were they purchased through an article distribution service? Maybe you're not providing enough quality content to attract visitors from these sites?

    Also, I'm not sure I see a social media aspect to your site. It appears to be a site with a lot of business-oriented articles on it, chock full of Google Ads. Is there a place for me to create a profile and share w/my friends? Am I missing something?

  • http://www.conversal.com/ Chris Heuer

    Thank you for this great write up – it is quite an amazing feeling to see people sharing this information forward as you have done so eloquently – for me, that is really the heart of social media, what we do with it and how we come to conversations about it. RSS has made the sharing easier through feed readers, expanding the distribution via its syndication technology. This may result in more page views but not necessarily. The RSS feed statistics can be seen in reports when you use a service like http://www.feedburner.com/ which are separate of the page views typically.

  • http://www.conversal.com/ Chris Heuer

    Thank you for this great write up – it is quite an amazing feeling to see people sharing this information forward as you have done so eloquently – for me, that is really the heart of social media, what we do with it and how we come to conversations about it. RSS has made the sharing easier through feed readers, expanding the distribution via its syndication technology. This may result in more page views but not necessarily. The RSS feed statistics can be seen in reports when you use a service like http://www.feedburner.com/ which are separate of the page views typically.