Clever Blog Marketing at Work

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Michael J. Pollack of smallbusinessbranding, a blog for the "solopreneur", wants your help.

Today he blogs about a Web site review for yourelevatorpitch.com. He asks people to review the site and provide feedback either in the comments or via trackbacks.

I’m not here to talk about Elevator Pitch (which has a simple, strong design, good colors, but lacks focus/direction; more details below,) but rather Michael’s clever marketing technique. What is he accomplishing?

  1. He’s going to get a lot of his readers to give free feedback and usability testing…otherwise he might have to pay for it!
  2. He’s getting some buzz going for Elevator Pitch (after all, you’re reading about it right now.)
  3. He’s generating a lot of incoming links for Elevator Pitch (hello, search engines!)
  4. He’s getting a lot of bloggers to link to his site (like me!)
  5. I’m getting a link from his blog back to mine (win for me!)
  6. He even says, "if you’d like to play…." See, it’s not work! It’s play! Everyone loves play.

Good marketing all around.

About ElevatorPitch.com:
It took me too long to figure out the point of the site. Yes, there’s  a misspelling about 10 words in, but someone already pointed that out. I like the simple layout, but because the One Cloudy Day pitch was on the left, my eyes went their first. I thought the point of the Web site was to sell Web site services to ad agencies. I mean, I don’t know who "One Cloudy Day" is.

"Make Pitch" doesn’t make sense to me. They couldn’t have fit in an "a"? Plus, the white on that orange is hurting my eyes.

There needs to be some explanation near the top of what the purpose of the site is. Not under Why Should I Do This? By that time, I thought this was a Web designer’s site looking for work. I wouldn’t read Why Should I Do This? then, because I don’t need a Web site.

Just my .02.

Rich Brooks
This is Why I Take the Stairs